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Imaging research regularly yields incidental findings that may have personal medical or reproductive decision-making significance to study participants. It is widely assumed that researchers have a moral obligation to disclose at least some kinds of incidental findings to research participants. However, it is also a widely held view that researchers do not have a moral obligation to actively look for abnormalities irrelevant to the aims of their study. This paper challenges that assumption.

Original publication

DOI

10.1002/eahr.500043

Type

Journal article

Journal

Ethics Hum Res

Publication Date

03/2020

Volume

42

Pages

2 - 12

Keywords

human subjects research, imaging research, incidental findings, return of research results