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<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>Choices rely on a transformation of sensory inputs into motor responses. Using invasive single neuron recordings, the evolution of a choice process has been tracked by projecting population neural responses into state spaces. Here we develop an approach that allows us to recover state space trajectories on a millisecond timescale in non-invasive human recordings. We selectively suppress activity related to relevant and irrelevant sensory inputs and response direction in magnetoencephalography data acquired during context-dependent choices. Recordings from premotor cortex show a smooth progression from sensory input encoding to response encoding. In contrast to previous macaque recordings, information related to choice-irrelevant features is represented more weakly than choice-relevant sensory information. To test whether this mechanistic difference between species is caused by extensive overtraining common in non-human primate studies, we trained humans on &gt;20,000 trials of the task. Choice-irrelevant features were still weaker than relevant features in premotor cortex after overtraining.</jats:p>

Original publication

DOI

10.1101/2020.02.24.962290

Type

Journal article

Publisher

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Publication Date

25/02/2020